WHAT IS A DANGEROUS CARBON MONOXIDE LEVEL?

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WHAT IS A DANGEROUS CARBON MONOXIDE LEVEL?

Every winter we get asked the same questions by clients, asking about Carbon monoxide (CO)… What carbon monoxide levels are dangerous?... So we thought we’d share with you some information.

As most people know, CO is a deadly, colorless, odorless, poisonous gas. It is produced by the incomplete burning of various fuels. These fuels include coal, wood, charcoal, oil, kerosene, propane, and natural gas. Equipment powered by internal combustion engines also produce CO. In many parts of Victoria and the Yarra Valley ducted heating (powered by natural gas) is a popular choice for heating homes during the colder months.

What levels of CO are dangerous…?

CO concentration is measured in parts per million (ppm), and this can be detected with a specific tool called a carbon monoxide reader or alarm. However, when speaking about the health dangers of CO poisoning you must consider the concentration of CO, and also the length of exposure.

Most healthy people will not experience any symptoms from prolonged exposure to CO levels of approximately 1 to 70 ppm. However, patients that are at higher risk, such as heart patients might experience increased chest pain. Being exposed to CO levels above 70 ppm for a prolonged period, will cause minor symptoms...(see below). Now for the really scary part.... sustained CO concentrations above 150 to 200 ppm, may cause  sometimes death!

What are the symptoms?

Some more truths…. Winter is when we all switch on the heating and warm our homes. It is also the season for the dreaded cold and flu! If you have children, work in healthcare, or childcare, or even just go outdoors to do the weekly shopping at the supermarket your likely to pick up a bug and get sick at least once this winter. Now what if I told you, that the symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to that of the flu! (without the fever).

They may include; headache, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness.

High level CO poisoning results in more severe symptoms such as; Mental confusion, vomiting , loss of muscular coordination, loss of consciousness and as mentioned even death.

 

So, there are some of the facts…what you need to consider now is which appliances/equipment in your home are fuelled by any of the above. If you have any (which most of us do) you need to think about when you last had it serviced by a professional. Our technicians are trained in how to detect dangerous CO levels, and also how to isolate, decommission or repair the source of any CO leaks. Call or email us on 1300252225, enquiries@alpineheatingandcooling.com.au and get one of our experts to give you peace of mind this winter.

Along with an annual service of all equipment you can also safeguard your home from CO poisoning by completing the following.

• Ensure there is some fresh air intake periodically into your home.

• Don’t use a gas heater overnight or for extended periods.

• Minimise the use of exhaust fans at the same time heaters are used. Using exhaust fans in the kitchen or bathroom can create negative pressure and lead to gas heater emissions being sucked back into the house rather than allowing them to be exhausted to the outside air.

• Do not use an unflued heater in a bedroom and minimise daily usage of unflued heaters.

• Consider replacing old heaters with new ones – get a quote from us at ALPINE, we’ll help work out the best heating solution for your home and help design a safer efficient system.

Call today 1300252 225

IF YOU THINK YOU MAY BE EXPERIENCING SYMPTOMS OF CO POSIONING – GET OUTSIDE IN THE FRESH AIR IMMEDIATELY! CALL FOR HELP AND GET CHECKED BY YOUR DOCTOR. ONLY RETURN TO YOU HOME ONLY AFTER IT HAS BEEN CHECKED BY A PROFESSIONAL.

Also see the following useful links.

https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/public-health/environmental-health/environmental-health-in-the-home/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-in-the-home

https://www.esv.vic.gov.au/campaigns/carbon-monoxide/


Tags: home heating |